Showing posts with label Emergency Food. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Emergency Food. Show all posts

Friday, April 26, 2013

FEMA Institute Self-Study

Did you know that the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) offers free classes? The Emergency Management Institute (EMI) offers emergency management training for emergency management professionals, government employees and the general public. As part of the National Preparedness Goal, their free online independent study program offers self-paced courses in nine “mission areas”:
  • Incident Management
  • Operational Planning
  • Disaster Logistics
  • Emergency Communications
  • Service to Disaster Victims
  • Continuity Programs
  • Public Disaster Communications
  • Integrated Preparedness
  • Hazard Mitigation
Class titles include:
  • Intro to Hazardous Materials
  • A Citizen’s Guide to Disaster Assistance
  • Animals in Disasters
  • Diversity Awareness
  • Orientation to FEMA Logistics
  • Multihazard Planning for Childcare
  • Household Hazardous Materials
  • Workplace Violence Awareness
  • Livestock in Disasters
There are many more interesting classes available - here’s the complete list: crslist.aspx. And did I mention they’re online, self-paced and free? There is a final exam at the end of each one, but you’ll feel more confident in your ability to handle disasters once you’ve aced the class. If you’re considering a career change, these classes can also help you move into a career as an emergency management professional.

If you’re already working as an emergency management professional, the Professional Development Series offers seven independent study courses that teach the fundamentals of emergency management.

There are a few application guidelines - you must be a U.S. citizen although there are a limited number of international seats available for each class. Also, classes fill up so you want to note the registration deadlines.

The Emergency Management Institute also offers on-site and remote classes if you’d like to attend on-campus.

For a full course and schedule list, go to EMICourses/.

Sunday, April 14, 2013

Disaster Survival Lists, Guides and Tips

Home Safety & Survival Tips:
  • Get an Emergency Weather Radio and make sure you know how to use it. Listen to your radio during an emergency for any further instructions, officials may call for evacuation in specific areas.
  • Be ready to take care of yourself with your ownWater Storage, Emergency Food, & Survival Supplies that you have prepared and stored. Don’t expect the government or anyone else to be available for a rescue, you are responsible for your own personal well-being.
  • You may not want to think of adding this option to your survival lists... but it is important to consider Self Defense Products to protect yourself from the looting, unruliness and panic that often follows a major emergency or disaster.
  • Chemical or airborne hazards require a special response, this is calledShelter-In-PlaceHere is a guide provided by the American Red Cross to help you fully prepare for that type of event.
Another very smart preparedness tip is becoming educated and prepared to take care of yourself and others around you by learning basic First Aid and CPR.
Thanks to the availability of computers, it is no longer necessary to leave your home to obtain a certificate for either of these life-saving techniques.
Here are two recommended courses that are available at a very reasonable cost and can be completed at your convenience:
  1. First Aid Skills Certification - Expert Rating Online First Aid Certifications.
  2. CPR Skills Certification - Expert Rating Online CPR Certifications.

Evacuation Tips For Your Survival Lists:

  • If your plan calls for an evacuation, get out early. Don’t wait until gasoline is in short supply and the highways are clogged.
  • Always have a backup travel plan, with various routes to and from home, work, school, etc.
  • Plan ahead with friends or family to stay in a distant city that is unlikely to be affected by the same disaster.
  • Plan a meeting place you have identified in advance with each member of the family, certain buildings around the city are set up as shelters, but if at all possible identify your own "safe house", so you won't be trying to beat thousands of others into a shelter.
  • Each member of the family should have their own Grab-bag. The purpose is to be able to grab-it-and-go, thus avoid running around the house packing it during an emergency. 1-3 days of emergency supplies should be in the bag. Suggested survival list items for the bag are included in the printableAll-Things-Emergency-Prepared 72 Hr Emergency Check List, if you would like to build a Grab-bag yourself.
  • Have a plan ready for your pet survival lists, your Dog and Cat Emergency Evacuation Kits, a pre-arranged place to stay with your pets (motel or hotel), or a place for your pets to stay if they cannot travel with you.
  • Keep Some Cash Available. During blackouts or power outages, cash registers, ATM's and other things that we use to get cash or make purchases, will not be available. You will be unable to swipe credit cards or access ATM's. Having cash readily available will allow you to make critical purchases that you need.
Berkey Filters
Emergency Water Tips:
Drinking Water Storage:
  • Fill all available containers, pots and pans with water.
  • Keep safe drinking water methods on hand, such as:
    filtering and disinfecting.
Emergency preparedness includes safe drinking water. The AquaPod Safe Emergency Drinking Water Storage Kit fits in your bathtub. The KIT lets you store 65 gallons of water, a 14 day supply for a family of 4 - Use it when a flood or hurricane is predicted that could interrupt a safe water supply.
General Use Water Storage:
(Do not use the following options for drinking, water can be used to flush toilets, wash your hands, etc.)
Increase your water storage quickly with items that most people already have:
  1. When fore-warned of an event, fill your bath tub, and sinks almost to the top.
  2. Additional water is available in your water heater, pipes and toilet fill-tank (don't use the bowl).
  3. Put two or three heavy-duty plastic trash bags inside each other. Then fill the inner bag with water, you can use your trash cans to give support to the bags.
  • Preserve water by saving the water from washing your hands, clothes and dishes to flush your toilets.
Emergency Home Made Water Purification System:
*This home made system is only for an emergency situation where you have no other means of purifying the water - 
  • This is a pour-though filtering system that can be made in an emergency, it will remove many contaminants, but should only be added to your survival lists as a "last resort" for water purification.
  1. Take a five or seven gallon pail (a 55-gallon drum can also be used for a larger scale system) and drill or punch a series of small holes on the bottom.
  2. Place several layers of cloth on the bottom of the bucket, this can be anything from denim to an old table cloth.
  3. Add a thick layer of sand (preferred) or loose dirt. This will be the main filtering element, so you should add at least half of the pail's depth.
  4. Add another few layers of cloth, weighted down with a few larger rocks.
  5. Your home-made filter should be several inches below the top of the bucket.
  6. Place another bucket or other collection device under the holes you punched on the bottom.
  7. Pour collected or gathered water into the top of your new filter system. As gravity works its magic, the water will filter through the media and drip out the bottom, into your collection device. If the water is cloudy or full of sediment, simply let it drop to the bottom and draw the cleaner water off the top of your collection device with a straw or tube.

Tuesday, April 9, 2013


It takes much more than the knowledge and skills to build shelters, get food, make fires, and travel without the aid of standard navigational devices to live successfully through a survival situation. Some people with little or no survival training have managed to survive life-threatening circumstances. Some people with survival training have not used their skills and died. A key ingredient in any survival situation is the mental attitude of the individual(s) involved. Having survival skills is important; having the will to survive is essential. Without a desk to survive, acquired skills serve little purpose and invaluable knowledge goes to waste.
There is a psychology to survival. The soldier in a survival environment faces many stresses that ultimately impact on his mind. These stresses can produce thoughts and emotions that, if poorly understood, can transform a confident, well-trained soldier into an indecisive, ineffective individual with questionable ability to survive. Thus, every soldier must be aware of and be able to recognize those stresses commonly associated with survival. Additionally, it is imperative that soldiers be aware of their reactions to the wide variety of stresses associated with survival. This chapter will identify and explain the nature of stress, the stresses of survival, and those internal reactions soldiers will naturally experience when faced with the stresses of a real-world survival situation. The knowledge you, the soldier, gain from this chapter and other chapters in this manual, will prepare you to come through the toughest times alive.


 Before we can understand our psychological reactions in a survival setting, it is helpful to first know a little bit about stress.
Stress is not a disease that you cure and eliminate. Instead, it is a condition we all experience. Stress can be described as our reaction to pressure. It is the name given to the experience we have as we physically, mentally, emotionally, and spiritually respond to life's tensions.

Need for Stress

We need stress because it has many positive benefits. Stress provides us with challenges; it gives us chances to learn about our values and strengths. Stress can show our ability to handle pressure without breaking; it tests our adaptability and flexibility; it can stimulate us to do our best. Because we usually do not consider unimportant events stressful, stress can also be an excellent indicator of the significance we attach to an event--in other words, it highlights what is important to us.
We need to have some stress in our lives, but too much of anything can be bad. The goal is to have stress, but not an excess of it. Too much stress can take its toll on people and organizations. Too much stress leads to distress. Distress causes an uncomfortable tension that we try to escape and, preferably, avoid. Listed below are a few of the common signs of distress you may find in your fellow soldiers or yourself when faced with too much stress:

  • Difficulty making decisions.

  • Angry outbursts.

  • Forgetfulness.

  • Low energy level.

  • Constant worrying.

  • Propensity for mistakes.

  • Thoughts about death or suicide.

  • Trouble getting along with others.

  • Withdrawing from others.

  • Hiding from responsibilities.

  • Carelessness.
As you can see, stress can be constructive or destructive. It can encourage or discourage, move us along or stop us dead in our tracks, and make life meaningful or seemingly meaningless. Stress can inspire you to operate successfully and perform at your maximum efficiency in a survival situation. It can also cause you to panic and forget all your training. Key to your survival is your ability to manage the inevitable stresses you will encounter. The survivor is the soldier who works with his stresses instead of letting his stresses work on him.

Survival Stressors

Any event can lead to stress and, as everyone has experienced, events don't always come one at a time. Often, stressful events occur simultaneously. These events are not stress, but they produce it and are called "stressors." Stressors are the obvious cause while stress is the response. Once the body recognizes the presence of a stressor, it then begins to act to protect itself.
In response to a stressor, the body prepares either to "fight or flee." This preparation involves an internal SOS sent throughout the body. As the body responds to this SOS, several actions take place. The body releases stored fuels (sugar and fats) to provide quick energy; breathing rate increases to supply more oxygen to the blood; muscle tension increases to prepare for action; blood clotting mechanisms are activated to reduce bleeding from cuts; senses become more acute (hearing becomes more sensitive, eyes become big, smell becomes sharper) so that you are more aware of your surrounding and heart rate and blood pressure rise to provide more blood to the muscles. This protective posture lets a person cope with potential dangers; however, a person cannot maintain such a level of alertness indefinitely.
Stressors are not courteous; one stressor does not leave because another one arrives. Stressors add up. The cumulative effect of minor stressors can be a major distress if they all happen too close together. As the body's resistance to stress wears down and the sources of stress continue (or increase), eventually a state of exhaustion arrives. At this point, the ability to resist stress or use it in a positive way gives out and signs of distress appear. Anticipating stressors and developing strategies to cope with them are two ingredients in the effective management of stress. It is therefore essential that the soldier in a survival setting be aware of the types of stressors he will encounter. Let's take a look at a few of these.
Injury, Illness, or Death
Injury, illness, and death are real possibilities a survivor has to face. Perhaps nothing is more stressful than being alone in an unfamiliar environment where you could die from hostile action, an accident, or from eating something lethal. Illness and injury can also add to stress by limiting your ability to maneuver, get food and drink, find shelter, and defend yourself. Even if illness and injury don't lead to death, they add to stress through the pain and discomfort they generate. It is only by con-trolling the stress associated with the vulnerability to injury, illness, and death that a soldier can have the courage to take the risks associated with survival tasks.
Uncertainly and Lack of Control
Some people have trouble operating in settings where everything is not clear-cut. The only guarantee in a survival situation is that nothing is guaranteed. It can be extremely stressful operating on limited information in a setting where you have limited control of your surroundings. This uncertainty and lack of control also add to the stress of being ill, injured, or killed.
Even under the most ideal circumstances, nature is quite formidable. In survival, a soldier will have to contend with the stressors of weather, terrain, and the variety of creatures inhabiting an area. Heat, cold, rain, winds, mountains, swamps, deserts, insects, dangerous reptiles, and other animals are just a few of the challenges awaiting the soldier working to survive. Depending on how a soldier handles the stress of his environment, his surroundings can be either a source of food and protection or can be a cause of extreme discomfort leading to injury, illness, or death.
Hunger and Thirst
Without food and water a person will weaken and eventually die. Thus, getting and preserving food and water takes on increasing importance as the length of time in a survival setting increases. For a soldier used to having his provisions issued, foraging can be a big source of stress.
Forcing yourself to continue surviving is not easy as you grow more tired. It is possible to become so fatigued that the act of just staying awake is stressful in itself.
There are some advantages to facing adversity with others. As soldiers we learn individual skills, but we train to function as part of a team. Although we, as soldiers, complain about higher headquarters, we become used to the information and guidance it provides, especially during times of confusion. Being in contact with others also provides a greater sense of security and a feeling someone is available to help if problems occur. A significant stressor in survival situations is that often a person or team has to rely solely on its own resources.
The survival stressors mentioned in this section are by no means the only ones you may face. Remember, what is stressful to one person may not be stressful to another. Your experiences, training, personal outlook on life, physical and mental conditioning, and level of self-confidence contribute to what you will find stressful in a survival environment. The object is not to avoid stress, but rather to manage the stressors of survival and make them work for you.
We now have a general knowledge of stress and the stressors common to survival; the next step is to examine our reactions to the stressors we may face.


Man has been able to survive many shifts in his environment throughout the centuries. His ability to adapt physically and mentally to a changing world kept him alive while other species around him gradually died off. The same survival mechanisms that kept our forefathers alive can help keep us alive as well! However, these survival mechanisms that can help us can also work against us if we don't understand and anticipate their presence.
It is not surprising that the average person will have some psychological reactions in a survival situation. We will now examine some of the major internal reactions you and anyone with you might experience with the survival stressors addressed in the earlier paragraphs. Let's begin.
FearFear is our emotional response to dangerous circumstances that we believe have the potential to cause death, injury, or illness. This harm is not just limited to physical damage; the threat to one's emotional and mental well-being can generate fear as well. For the soldier trying to survive, fear can have a positive function if it encourages him to be cautious in situations where recklessness could result in injury. Unfortunately, fear can also immobilize a person. It can cause him to become so frightened that he fails to perform activities essential for survival. Most soldiers will have some degree of fear when placed in unfamiliar surroundings under adverse conditions. There is no shame in this! Each soldier must train himself not to be overcome by his fears. Ideally, through realistic training, we can acquire the knowledge and skills needed to increase our confidence and thereby manage our fears.
AnxietyAssociated with fear is anxiety. Because it is natural for us to be afraid, it is also natural for us to experience anxiety. Anxiety can be an uneasy, apprehensive feeling we get when faced with dangerous situations (physical, mental, and emotional). When used in a healthy way, anxiety urges us to act to end, or at least master, the dangers that threaten our existence. If we were never anxious, there would be little motivation to make changes in our lives. The soldier in a survival setting reduces his anxiety by performing those tasks that will ensure his coming through the ordeal alive. As he reduces his anxiety, the soldier is also bringing under control the source of that anxiety--his fears. In this form, anxiety is good; however, anxiety can also have a devastating impact. Anxiety can overwhelm a soldier to the point where he becomes easily confused and has difficulty thinking. Once this happens, it becomes more and more difficult for him to make good judgments and sound decisions. To survive, the soldier must learn techniques to calm his anxieties and keep them in the range where they help, not hurt.

Anger and Frustration

Frustration arises when a person is continually thwarted in his attempts to reach a goal. The goal of survival is to stay alive until you can reach help or until help can reach you. To achieve this goal, the soldier must complete some tasks with minimal resources. It is inevitable, in trying to do these tasks, that something will go wrong; that something will happen beyond the soldier's control; and that with one's life at stake, every mistake is magnified in terms of its importance. Thus, sooner or later, soldiers will have to cope with frustration when a few of their plans run into trouble. One outgrowth of this frustration is anger. There are many events in a survival situation that can frustrate or anger a soldier. Getting lost, damaged or forgotten equipment, the weather, inhospitable terrain, enemy patrols, and physical limitations are just a few sources of frustration and anger. Frustration and anger encourage impulsive reactions, irrational behavior, poorly thought-out decisions, and, in some insta nces, an "I quit" attitude (people sometimes avoid doing something they can't master). If the soldier can harness and properly channel the emotional intensity associated with anger and frustration, he can productively act as he answers the challenges of survival. If the soldier does not properly focus his angry feelings, he can waste much energy in activities that do little to further either his chances of survival or the chances of those around him.


It would be a rare person indeed who would not get sad, at least momentarily, when faced with the privations of survival. As this sadness deepens, we label the feeling "depression." Depression is closely linked with frustration and anger. The frustrated person becomes more and more angry as he fails to reach his goals. If the anger does not help the person to succeed, then the frustration level goes even higher. A destructive cycle between anger and frustration continues until the person becomes worn down-physically, emotionally, and mentally. When a person reaches this point, he starts to give up, and his focus shifts from "What can I do" to "There is nothing I can do." Depression is an expression of this hopeless, helpless feeling. There is nothing wrong with being sad as you temporarily think about your loved ones and remember what life is like back in "civilization" or "the world." Such thoughts, in fact, can give you the desire to try harder and live one more day. On the other hand, if you allow yours elf to sink into a depressed state, then it can sap all your energy and, more important, your will to survive. It is imperative that each soldier resist succumbing to depression.

Loneliness and Boredom

Man is a social animal. This means we, as human beings, enjoy the company of others. Very few people want to be alone all the time! As you are aware, there is a distinct chance of isolation in a survival setting. This is not bad. Loneliness and boredom can bring to the surface qualities you thought only others had. The extent of your imagination and creativity may surprise you. When required to do so, you may discover some hidden talents and abilities. Most of all, you may tap into a reservoir of inner strength and fortitude you never knew you had. Conversely, loneliness and boredom can be another source of depression. As a soldier surviving alone, or with others, you must find ways to keep your mind productively occupied. Additionally, you must develop a degree of self-sufficiency. You must have faith in your capability to "go it alone."


The circumstances leading to your being in a survival setting are sometimes dramatic and tragic. It may be the result of an accident or military mission where there was a loss of life. Perhaps you were the only, or one of a few, survivors. While naturally relieved to be alive, you simultaneously may be mourning the deaths of others who were less fortunate. It is not uncommon for survivors to feel guilty about being spared from death while others were not. This feeling, when used in a positive way, has encouraged people to try harder to survive with the belief they were allowed to live for some greater purpose in life. Sometimes, survivors tried to stay alive so that they could carry on the work of those killed. Whatever reason you give yourself, do not let guilt feelings prevent you from living. The living who abandon their chance to survive accomplish nothing. Such an act would be the greatest tragedy.


Your mission as a soldier in a survival situation is to stay alive. As you can see, you are going to experience an assortment of thoughts and emotions. These can work for you, or they can work to your downfall. Fear, anxiety, anger, frustration, guilt, depression, and loneliness are all possible reactions to the many stresses common to survival. These reactions, when controlled in a healthy way, help to increase a soldier's likelihood of surviving. They prompt the soldier to pay more attention in training, to fight back when scared, to take actions that ensure sustenance and security, to keep faith with his fellow soldiers, and to strive against large odds. When the survivor cannot control these reactions in a healthy way, they can bring him to a standstill. Instead of rallying his internal resources, the soldier listens to his internal fears. This soldier experiences psychological defeat long before he physically succumbs. Remember, survival is natural to everyone; being unexpectedly thrust into the life and death struggle of survival is not. Don't be afraid of your "natural reactions to this unnatural situation." Prepare yourself to rule over these reactions so they serve your ultimate interest--staying alive with the honor and dignity associated with being an American soldier.
It involves preparation to ensure that your reactions in a survival setting are productive, not destructive. The challenge of survival has produced countless examples of heroism, courage, and self-sacrifice. These are the qualities it can bring out in you if you have prepared yourself. Below are a few tips to help prepare yourself psychologically for survival. Through studying this manual and attending survival training you can develop the survival attitude.

Know Yourself

Through training, family, and friends take the time to discover who you are on the inside. Strengthen your stronger qualities and develop the areas that you know are necessary to survive.

Anticipate Fears

Don't pretend that you will have no fears. Begin thinking about what would frighten you the most if forced to survive alone. Train in those areas of concern to you. The goal is not to eliminate the fear, but to build confidence in your ability to function despite your fears.

Be Realistic

Don't be afraid to make an honest appraisal of situations. See circumstances as they are, not as you want them to be. Keep your hopes and expectations within the estimate of the situation. When you go into a survival setting with unrealistic expectations, you may be laying the groundwork for bitter disappointment. Follow the adage, "Hope for the best, prepare for the worst." It is much easier to adjust to pleasant surprises about one's unexpected good fortunes than to be upset by one's unexpected harsh circumstances.

Adopt a Positive Attitude

Learn to see the potential good in everything. Looking for the good not only boosts morale, it also is excellent for exercising your imagination and creativity.

Remind Yourself What Is at Stake

Remember, failure to prepare yourself psychologically to cope with survival leads to reactions such as depression, carelessness, inattention, loss of confidence, poor decision-making, and giving up before the body gives in. At stake is your life and the lives of others who are depending on you to do your share.


Through military training and life experiences, begin today to prepare yourself to cope with the rigors of survival. Demonstrating your skills in training will give you the confidence to call upon them should the need arise. Remember, the more realistic the training, the less overwhelming an actual survival setting will be.

Learn Stress Management Techniques

People under stress have a potential to panic if they are not well-trained and not prepared psychologically to face whatever the circumstances may be. While we often cannot control the survival circumstances in which we find ourselves, it is within our ability to control our response to those circumstances. Learning stress management techniques can enhance significantly your capability to remain calm and focused as you work to keep yourself and others alive. A few good techniques to develop include relaxation skills, time management skills, assertiveness skills, and cognitive restructuring skills (the ability to control how you view a situation).
Remember, "the will to survive" can also be considered to be "the refusal to give up."

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Saturday, March 9, 2013

Wise Food Storage Newsletter: Vegetarian Nutrition Hide Details

Vegetarian Nutrition Hide Details

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The number of folks choosing a vegetarian diet is expanding. You can get all the nutrition you need with a smart vegetarian diet; however, the biggest concern for vegetarians is getting enough protein, which can be particularly challenging when relying on emergency food or survival food. Still, it’s not difficult with a little bit of pre-planning.

How much protein do I need?

First, let’s talk about protein. As a general rule, between 10 percent and 15 percent of your total calories should come from protein. A gram of protein has 4 calories. Earlier we talked about how to calculate your BMR number. Once you have your BMR, multiply it by .10 then divide by 4.

BMR x .10 / 4 = grams of protein you need per day

Generally, women need about 40 grams and men need about 50 grams of protein per day.

Before you figure out how to get enough protein, it’s helpful to understand what protein is:

What is protein?

Proteins are chains of amino acids connected by peptide bonds. Humans use 20 amino acids to build muscle and other parts of the body. Of the 20 amino acids, humans can only make (synthesize) 11; the other nine (leucine, isoleucine, valine, lysine, threonine, tryptophan, methionine, phenylalanine and histidine) must be obtained from food. Vegetable sources of these proteins are low in fat and deliver lots of other essential vitamins and minerals at the same time, so it’s no wonder one in seven Americans has gone vegetarian.


Some vegetarians eat fish, dairy and eggs, qualifying for the lengthy technical title ovolactopescatarian.

  1. Fish - with few exceptions, fish is low in fat and the higher-fat kinds contain “healthy” fat, so fish is a great protein option.
  2. Eggs contain about 5 grams of fat and 6 grams of protein each, or stick with the whites and you’ll get 4 grams of protein with 0 fat.
  3. Dairy - milk and cheese comes in full-fat and reduced-fat varieties. Save the full-fat for special occasions and enjoy reduced-fat dairy for around 7 grams of protein and 2 grams of fat per ounce.

Options for everyone:

Whether you’re a carnivore, herbivore or something in between, getting some of your protein from vegetable, whole grain and legume protein is going to improve your health and expand your horizons. Here are the powerhouses of vegetable-based protein that everyone can enjoy.

  1. Quinoa - a little grain from South America that is a protein dynamo with 18 grams of protein per cup
  2. Beans, lentils and peas - around 14 grams per cup. Garbanzo beans (chick peas) are even higher.
  3. Soy - 7 grams per cup and can be found in everything from soy “sausage” to soy ice cream. Some recent research suggests soy can affect hormones - both beneficially and adversely - so do a little homework before you rely too much on soy milk, tofu, and the many soy-based meat substitutes.
  4. Nuts - around 8 grams per cup - but be mindful of the high fat content of nuts - you don’t want to eat a whole cup every day!
  5. Vegetables and fruit - dried apricots (8 grams per cup), avocado, asparagus and spinach (5 grams per cup) are MVPs when it comes to combining vitamin C, fiber and protein.

Among Wise freeze dried foods some are higher in protein than others (meat lovers can add our popular seasoned freeze-dried meat packets) but our vegetarian friends get a head start with high protein entrees like Cheesy Lasagna, Chili Macaroni and Teriyaki Rice, and for even more protein and variety, add our new freeze-dried vegetable and fruit packets.

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Sunday, February 24, 2013

Emergency Essentials For Urban Survival

Emergency essentials, include a wide variety of survival items needed for urban survival in case an emergency were to hit home. The first and foremost idea every home owner should consider is a cache of water, The human body cannot go any longer than three days without it. Having a 55 gal barrel would be ideal if a known emergency situation was going to arrive. You could fill up the bathtub and sinks as well. Having stainless steel cookware would be ideal for boiling water if the known water source has become contaminated. Stainless steel will not rust, can be cleaned easily and is extremely durable. This emergency essentials guide is depicting a scenario that would be 7 days long.
Since this survival situation will be occurring at home, shelter would not be the next item to secure. In a urban and wilderness survival situation water, shelter, fire, food is how one would prioritize his or her actions.
Communication would be a high priority. You and your family will need to know what is happening in the outside world in order to base a decision on which appropriate action to take. Having a hand held magneto type shortwave AM/FM radio with a built in flashlight would be a good choice, they do not rely on batteries and with one minute of cranking you would have two hours of airtime, Depending upon the severity of the crisis cell phones may be unreliable and ought to be kept powered down to preserve battery power since there would be no way to charge them, except if you have invested in a home gasoline powered electrical generator.
An emergency essentials checklist would include a resource for fire. Ultimately in a home environment a white gas backpacking stove would give you a means for cooking food, as well as disinfecting water, This ought to be performed in a separate ventilated area to ensure nobody gets carbon monoxide poisoning. In the event this emergency predicament fell in the heart of a frigid winter. The household will need to position themselves in a single area with all the insulating materials that could be acquired. One's body heat alone should keep everybody comfortable. Some could be tempted to use the stove as a method to obtain heat within the safe room but left unattended falling asleep may very well be fatal.
Survival food, everybody knows what happens when NOAA is forecasting 6 inches of snow or more, people go bat crazy and wipe almost everything off of the store shelves. What would happen if a regional emergency was forecasted involving a total power outage or some thing of that nature? One would not really want to be on the road, let alone going to any food supply chain. Possessing a couple of weeks worth of canned goods and water needs to be considered. If a crisis never comes about good, but if it does...
Lastly emergency essentials must include cash as well as a firearm. More than likely credit lines will be down and cash would be your only exchange for goods provided there is electrical power. Survival preparation needs to be viewed as a social obligation, one that every individual owes to his / her loved ones and community and his or her nation.
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Monday, February 18, 2013

Prepper Tips for Babies and Children

Emergency situations and natural disasters are never picture-perfect situations. When emergencies strike, we all need to be prepared to survive until the crisis is over. But, there are special circumstances when we have to put the needs of others before our own. When it comes to babies and children, they will turn to the adults around them for survival. That's why there are special preparations that need to be made for preppers who have children in the home. These tips are also valuable for businesses, such as schools and daycare centers, who serve children. These essential items should to be included in your emergency survival kit to ensure that babies and children have what they need:
Emergency Prepper Tips for Babies Babies have unique needs. These needs must be met, even during a crisis situation. Here are some tips for preparing an emergency kit for babies:

  • Formula – Even if your baby is breastfed, exclusively, your kit should include formula for your baby. During an emergency, many women go through stress. Some even become dehydrated. Both of these factors can affect a mother's ability to breastfeed. Be sure to store formula with a long shelf life, such as canned formulas or powdered formula.
  • Diapers – It's always wise to store extra diapers, just in case. Emergency preparedness experts recommend cloth diapers for emergency kits. They take up less storage space than boxes of disposable diapers. They can also be washed out by hand to be re-used over and over again.
  • Clothing – Your storage should contain full outfits for each baby to last three or more days. It's best to store various sizes, just in case your baby goes through a growth spurt after your kit has been put together.
  • Baby Medication – As you know, your baby can't take medications made for adults. During a disaster, your baby may feel your stress. This could lead to minor colds, allergies, even stomach aches. Be sure you have baby-grade medications stored just in case your baby gets sick during an emergency.
  • Baby Carrier – As soon as a crisis hits, your first instinct will be to grab your baby. In a matter of seconds, you'll realize that you need to grab many other things, such as your emergency kits. It will be much easier to handle all of this at once if you can simply attach your baby to your body and keep moving. Have a convenient carrier ready for this purpose. Then, your hands will be free to grab other things as you and your baby run out the door.
Emergency Prepper Tips for Children There are two major additions to your preparedness kit that must be included if there are children in your home:
  1. Emergency Food – Children can be notorious for being picky eaters. In a crisis situation, this can become a very serious problem. If your emergency food storage is filled with foods your child doesn't like, they may refuse to eat any of it. This can cause malnutrition, low-energy, low-blood sugar, and various other health risks. Be sure to store foods that your children actually enjoy eating. This will ensure that they get the vitamins, minerals and caloric intake they need to stay healthy during the crisis.
  2. Entertainment – Many parents may not feel like entertainment is essential during an emergency. However, a major tragedy can cause stress in children. Having entertainment that can help them escape from the stress caused by the disaster can help them maintain mentally. A good prepper should store a variety of games and puzzles, as well as other forms of entertainment for children.